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Little Christine

LG's Taking Dolly(ies) to Bed

LG's: Take Dolly(ies) to Bed?  

17 members have voted

  1. 1. For LG's Do you Take Dolly or Dollies to bed with you? (presuming you can)

    • Yes
      14
    • No
      3


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For LG's do you take Dolly or Dollies to bed?

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Rachel Emily    101

Most definitely yes. Two of my dollies occupy a prominent place on my bed, though in truth I alternate between cuddling them and my plush bunny.

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I sleep in a twin bed with both 29" Andrea Lynne Rachel Christine and 35" Lisa Michelle Denise Christine who are big dollies and I do not have any problems: I even wear a tiara to bed and have no problems, either. There is a pad between us that goes form my neck to past my knees, like the old "bundling board" or "chastity pad" that used to be used when two persons not married to each other slept in the same bed to keep their bodies from touching each other.

Dollies are little persons and you have no idea how it makes them feel to sleep under the same blankets and with their head on the same pillow as their "mama"

I may be too submissive but sometimes I put my head on Dolly's shoulder or give her a kiss. Dollies love the quick little girl kisses on the cheek that you learn to do when you are 3 years old

Edited by Christine Daryleanne

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How can you look into their sparkly eyes and see those pursed lips and even THINK of breaking their little hearts? Especially when they do so much for us girls

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littlekat    37

I think its because I had/have so many porcelain dolls I was always scared I'd hurt them if I slept with them cause I'm a... violent sleeper (I roll around and fall out of beds, I wake up facing the wrong way a lot) so stuffed animals can take it but dolls would probably break v.v

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How could anyone only have porcelain dolls in the last 65 years? Let alone the last 25. I saw many of them at Severs from about 10 to 5 years ago and some LG'S at Girltalk. to would get them and try to treat them like real dolls with the predictable results but even so, that still seems like an anomaly

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littlekat    37

Tbh I think it's because I was a bit of a tomboy but I liked collecting porcelain dolls for some reason so I was never interested in barbies or anything and my family and family friends kept getting me them. I have around 20 I think now but I used to have a lot more.

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I have Disney Princess toddler dolls. After I kiss them goodnight and put them in their places I always pick one to hold while I sleep. I used to roll around a lot but since I started holding a dolly whilst I sleep I hardly roll around at all. I think even my subconscious knows the importance of keeping my dollies safe.

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Rachel Emily    101
5 minutes ago, FairySparkles said:

I have Disney Princess toddler dolls. After I kiss them goodnight and put them in their places I always pick one to hold while I sleep. I used to roll around a lot but since I started holding a dolly whilst I sleep I hardly roll around at all. I think even my subconscious knows the importance of keeping my dollies safe.

Oooh! Do you have Anna and Elsa?

My Cabbage Patch dolls, Amy Lynn and Emily Marie, sleep with me, along with a menagerie of stuffed animals. My more realistic dolly, Katie, is more for display but I do like to hold her.

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I have Anna and Elsa (also Sofia the First & Snow White) set aside to be opened as my Christmas presents this year. My girlfriend last year got me second hand Cinderella, Ariel, and Belle dolls whom I still treasure (even though she dumped me it's not their fault) along with my first dolly Little Alice! Someday I would love to have a larger doll like Christine talked about, but I haven't seen one around that was within my budget.

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I never liked the idea of "character" dolls. it seemed to be restrictive. We had Shirley Temple dolls and "Betsy Wetsy" was not a specific character, but one created for the doll. I always thought of dolls as a kind of person and being a "character" restricted how I could interact with her and made her less than a whole person

http://www.dailydiapers.com/board/index.php?/blogs/entry/1679-dolly/

Even a bride doll was generic. The more you particularize the identity of the doll the less her range of being as the character was more important than the doll. Also, when I was little, the Shirley Temple doll was half a generation out of date. The "Hoppy" things were not quite as archaic, but they still did not resonate with me and were a much bigger hit with my uncle's generation (1906-25) and the one immediately after that like my older cousins' (I was born in Sept '45 and much closer to a baby-boomer in culture and temperament)

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Rachel Emily    101
2 hours ago, Christine Daryleanne said:

I never liked the idea of "character" dolls. it seemed to be restrictive. We had Shirley Temple dolls and "Betsy Wetsy" was not a specific character, but one created for the doll. I always thought of dolls as a kind of person and being a "character" restricted how I could interact with her and made her less than a whole person

http://www.dailydiapers.com/board/index.php?/blogs/entry/1679-dolly/

Even a bride doll was generic. The more you particularize the identity of the doll the less her range of being as the character was more important than the doll. Also, when I was little, the Shirley Temple doll was half a generation out of date. The "Hoppy" things were not quite as archaic, but they still did not resonate with me and were a much bigger hit with my uncle's generation (1906-25) and the one immediately after that like my older cousins' (I was born in Sept '45 and much closer to a baby-boomer in culture and temperament)

I think you're greatly underestimating the imagination of little girls. If they can particularize, say, a Strawberry Shortcake doll or a plush Smurfette, they can do it with just about anything.

Would the "Chatty Cathy" (or the boy's counterpart, "Chatty Brother") count as a character doll? I had Chatty Brother, and although I was socialized as a boy, the way I interacted with the doll was similar to the way a little girl would. He could be my "baby" and ersatz little brother one day, my "co-anchor" when I played "newscaster" the next. Same as with my talking "Casper" doll--I saw him as real, and viewed him as a friend with whom I could pretend. In other words, even though he was a character doll, I could pretend he was anything, same as I could with a real friend.

EDIT: I suppose, having been born at the end of the Boomer era, that I'm more a Gen Xer in culture and temperament, so perhaps our differences are cultural as well as chronological.

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The talking dolls, were by nature, limited to what they could say and that was randomly determined. With a "generic" doll, you start from go, even naming her. just like you would if you had a baby. Also, the human doll engages the facial recognition human function. If the first doll I saw did not have glass and therefore, light-catching, and therefore, more realistic, eyes, it is highly unlikely that the question of person would even have come up

Also, you do not want to rely on too much imagination, otherwise you lose the species identification. Most persons have no idea of how dangerous bears and other large animals are because of the cutesy stuffed animals and cartoon animals (and I am a huge Yogi Bear fan). You want some learning to take place, especially same-species attachment. Patti Playpal was the first of the jumbo "companion" dolls, nearly the size of the little girl, able to walk, etc. Then there was "Talky Tina" who was "almost alive" and served as the idea behind "Chatty Cathy" with June Foray voicing both. However the more specifically the doll functions the less that is left to imagination and the less motivation is to imagine so the pre-set function doll, defined by character or function, discourages intentional, active imagination and creativity since the doll's identity or function are pre-defined in identity or context. Elsa or Anna are Elsa and Anna and that is all they will ever be, like Shirley Temple. Andrea or Lisa were not Andrea or Lisa  until I looked at them, especially the eyes, and thought "That is [Andrea or Lisa]" The character dolls are externally defined. The others are definable and need to be defined by the people-person from name to personality

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6 hours ago, Christine Daryleanne said:

Andrea or Lisa were not Andrea or Lisa  until I looked at them, especially the eyes, and thought "That is [Andrea or Lisa]" The character dolls are externally defined. The others are definable and need to be defined by the people-person from name to personality

I would love to find a larger doll that speaks to me when I look into her eyes the way that Andrea and Lisa did for you. Until that happens I'm going to enjoy the doll friends I have and treat them with the love and kindness I give to all my friends. Even though their names and backstories are predetermined it's what we do together that makes them special to me. Just like it is with real friends. They come with their own names and stories, but it is what we do together that makes them an important part of our lives.

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Look on Ebay for larger 28" 36" dolls. Their bodies are made of hard material but the shape, being human, makes them huggable. Also, you have to do most of the "work" since they are generic dolls. Andrea and Lisa are in my About Me section. Once you give something a name, especially a doll, that gives it individual recognition and a "personality"
 

You must also learn to read the expression. It is not a true expression, it is a pre-experssion. It can become a smile and/or giggles or it can become a fronw and tears, with equal likelihood, it depends on the story that the little girl is living at the moment. Prior to about 1959 or so, the idea of a doll was to be as "open" as possible with as few restrictions as possible, to encourage girls to learn the full range of feelings and communications and how to take care of a little one

 

The disappearance of the generic, "open-ended" doll, and the lessening of the role of dolls in the lives of little girls, often in the name of "gender equality", (actually gender elimination based on a tacit belief that the feminine is, in fact, inferior and of less value which I do not buy for a gazillionth of a second)  has led to some tragic consequences

http://www.dailydiapers.com/board/index.php?/blogs/entry/2803-tragic-sign-of-the-times/

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Sashiku    0

I have loads of plushies on my bed, but sometimes I put my reborn doll Kiley on the other side of my bed and remove some of the plushies.I also put a pillow behind her on the edge even though the bed is huge and i doubt she would ever fall off. I do cuddle her a bit before bed and sometimes fall asleep with her in my arms. I slept with my baby alive doll once too.

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Katelyn Ann    8

I currently take my joy stuffie to bed with me at night <3 Miss says I'm not allowed to take my Lalaloopsy doll to bed anymore (she has rolled onto her hard head one to many times while we sleep :/)  

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A dolly is very different from a stuffed animal. First it is a "person" in that it is person-shaped, with a readable expression that communicates. Second, she has a person's name or nickname. These make her like us via anthropomorphism; a kind of projection. Being intimate with such a one, for a little girl of 4, 5 or even older "conditions" the girl to the human world on a very close level. You also have to learn how to sleep with another person and learning to sleep with a dolly teaches you that. I sleep with two dolls in a twin bed plus some other things and I manage

Stuffed animals are not unique to girls, or anyone, they apply to babies and boys up to about age 7. Our dollies are unique to us. Having one or more of them so close to us makes us different from boys and babies

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Abi    24

Plushie Agnes always comes to bed with me :)

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Nope, no dolls in bed for me. I'd rather have a stuffed animal, unless the doll is a rag doll or some other type of soft doll. 

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Awwwww. You have no idea how a dolly loves to be taken to bed. That represents the height of acceptance to her. Being under the same covers and with her head on the same pillow as you says "you are a real little person" to her. The only reason I do not take Cassandra Lynette Estelle Christine to bed very often is because she is a bride dolly and has many accoutremnts that get in the way. This is part of what makes a doll into a dolly. The shape of a doll's body being so close to human makes up a good deal for not being soft. I love the feel of Andrea Lynne' s and Lisa Michelle's body and their clothes, and giving them the light, quick little-girl kiss on the cheek that dollies love. We also follow the custom of touching tiaras like Fairies who are close to each other

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My dolly Sammi sleeps on my bed during the day and we play tea party when I get home.  I let her guard my bed for sleeping on the headboard and sleep with my plushie stuffy BunBun.  All 3 of us are diapered for bedwetting.

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Dolly is more like a person in appearance, name and shape and therefore more like me and I can feel much more affection for her. 40 years ago, my real cats used to sleep with me and preferred to sleep at the lower part of the bed, 32 years ago, I did have a cat that used to like to sleep under the covers with his head on the pillow. You have no idea how thrilled Dolly is to sleep under the same covers with her head on the same pillow as you. It makes her feel like a real person and she will reward you handsomely for that consideration. There is a special bond of similarity between a Little Girl and her Dolls. Shirley Temple, in the parts she played hated to hurt a doll and after the scene she had to be sure that the doll was all right (they were speciall props that were "breakable" and re-assmblable)

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