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What Is It To Be Transgender?

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What is it to be Transgender? Is it a frame of mind or something more? I recently chaged from a sissy to a transexual becouse i feel i identify with women more then men. i think this is so beocuse i as a man hates everything and everyone including myself for dirving people away (i beleve that is becouse my father died when i was seven and never really got over it shuting out all forms of emotion) , but me as a woman (chalsie) dosent she is friendly and happy to help, is this normal for a trangender person to fell this way? any help would be apreciated,

Thank you, Chalsie

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What is it to be Transgender? This is a really good question and not one that's so easy to answer. Is it a frame of mind or something more? Well I'd say it partly both. It's a frame of mind in that it certainly colours your outlook on life, the way you think about things and the way you feel about yourself. But, it also more than that. It's also about who you feel you really are and the way you see yourself. It's about the role you see yourself in.

My gender issues are something I've struggled with all my life. I've always identified a lot more with women and not at all with any of the guys that I've been around. I always felt that, had I been given a choice, I would had been a girl. When I was still trying to live as a man I was very uncomfortable. I was angry and depressed alot of the time. I wasn't happy with my situation or with my life. Things are starting to change for me and I'm a lot happier with who I am now. I think that being happier with myself is reflected in the way i act towards others, too.

There is a difference between transgender and transsexual, though. Transgender is a blanket trem used to describe a lot of different gender issuses. Transsexuals are certainly transgendered but so are transvestites and just people who are not comfortable in the role assigned to their birth sex, etc. So, it's really a pretty broad term.

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Thank you for you'r replay as i know you are probally reading this now i wanted to thank you from the bottom of my heart. it really help to know that there are more prople in my situation

Thank you, Chalsie

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My heart goes out to all of you - so sad seeing people of 18 trying to cope with thoughts of being transgendered.

From the bottom of my heart I feel for you all. Although I am a girl and was born a girl and only know life as a girl I am still now trying to understand what it is you are all feeling and going through in the journey to find out who you really are.

It must be hell on earth for you and I wish I could do something to help but as usual all I can do is listen but that isn't much.

So many people are closed minded to your dilemmas and it is such a shame. If people put themselves into your shoes they would only be a quarter way there to understanding but at least trying to understand.

I find TG's and Transexual people fascinating and want to understand better, but I am no psychologist I don't pretend to be but I can be your friend and if you need to talk I will listen and I hope it goes part way to helping you find the true person inside.

You are all very special people and I think you are all very brave having to cope each day with your thoughts and feelings. May you find happiness one way or another in your lives - I certainly will be thinking about you all. :thumbsup:

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Thnak you for you replay i realise it has benn a wile since you posted but i wanted to say thank you for you'r support and care. please fell fre to IM Me on yahoo (baby_g_diaperlover) i will try to answer you questions or just be you friend dont be afraid.

Thank you, Chalsie

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<_< Haven't been here in a while... Was thinking about writing a seething letter in General Forum to the whole community.

What is Transgenderism?

Well how do I best approach that question? I can tell you what it isn't, its not conforming to the gender that was printed on your birth certificate. Its not giving up to societies views just because there is a small struggle attatched.

But what is it exactly? Well, for the most part I tend to think that it differs between people, as Transgenderism is a blanket term for anyone who identifies in any form or another with the opposite gender. Even being a sissy can be considered a form of Transgenderism. However me personally, I know that I was meant to be a woman just from the way I look at things, I was just jilted by genetics.

So what can I do about it? Nothing really, I've decided not to get the surgery due to some influential friends in the community. I'd still take hormones, but surgery doesn't change who I am.

I don't think its frame of mind, because objectively I could be seen as a boy because I have that tomboyish quality of being loud and having a more risque sense of humor as well as an independant streak a gazillion miles long. But once you dig deeper you find a girl who's just wearing that tomboy attitude to make sure that she doesn't get hurt, she wants true love and exists in color and emotion.

Frame of mind? Nah... Fate? Nah... Why try to explain it? Just let it be.

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But once you dig deeper you find a girl who's just wearing that tomboy attitude to make sure that she doesn't get hurt, she wants true love and exists in color and emotion.

What a good way of putting things Kanji straight and to the point.

It is difficult to really put yourself in someone elses shoes when u have not and will never go through what they are going through. But I imagine it must be an uphill struggle every day specially if you are not going to have the operation it must feel as if you are in some sort of mental prison, it must be so difficult to live with. Not only that but the way society is, although it has got a bit better now, but still there are so many bigoted and unfriendly people out there who just dont want to understand.

People are afraid of the unknown but there is no harm trying to get to know and understand how another person is feeling.

A lot of my friends are Transgendered and I think they are the most loving people out there. So called "Normal" people moan about so little in comparison.

I can understand also the frustration of it all - all you want to be is the person you feel inside - but because of a genetic fault you are being disallowed the right to be who you are.

I will always talk to people of transgender and if you ever feel like talking Kanji please get in touch - I wish i could help more - just remember you are all very special people don't ever forget that!

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My heart goes out to all of you - so sad seeing people of 18 trying to cope with thoughts of being transgendered.

From the bottom of my heart I feel for you all. Although I am a girl and was born a girl and only know life as a girl I am still now trying to understand what it is you are all feeling and going through in the journey to find out who you really are.

It must be hell on earth for you and I wish I could do something to help but as usual all I can do is listen but that isn't much.

So many people are closed minded to your dilemmas and it is such a shame. If people put themselves into your shoes they would only be a quarter way there to understanding but at least trying to understand.

I find TG's and Transexual people fascinating and want to understand better, but I am no psychologist I don't pretend to be but I can be your friend and if you need to talk I will listen and I hope it goes part way to helping you find the true person inside.

You are all very special people and I think you are all very brave having to cope each day with your thoughts and feelings. May you find happiness one way or another in your lives - I certainly will be thinking about you all. :thumbsup:

For me, I wish I had known at 18 that this is who I was. I think it would have been easier than finding out later in life.

I am comming up on my 33rd birthday in a couple of weeks and have found myself well established in life as a male and really beyond the point of no return. I would loose so much at this point if I was to transition fully. It is ashame that society, for a large part, looks down on transgenderism.

I know that if I were 18 again and knew what I know now, I would come out of the closet in a heartbeat, creating an adult life as the female I feel I am. But, since that isn't an option, I am doomed to live a double life. My public life shall always be male. Fortunantly, I have a wife who is totally supportive of who I really am and I am free to be female in my private life.

With all of this being said, I encourage anyone who is young and feels that they were born the wrong gender to consider what lies ahead with delaying if you are serious about transitioning.

I know that each of us are different people with different circumstances, so not everyone can be who they want, but I did want to share a bit about me and give some food for thought.

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I want to thank everyone who responded to my question and gave some insite to who i am. i would like to tell everyone that i finaly came out to my family. it fells so much better now that i can act ike i feel inside but denied becouse i had to live up yo being someone im not. you know untill now i have live a life of pure lonlyness becouse i pushed eveyone away becouse i was scared of invisable/emotional bonds that people form. now that i know im a TG i things make much more since. like that pice of the puzzle that was missing to revele the big picture. the only hard part now is that since i have never realy used my emotions before it has been realy hard for me not to start cry becouse of something someone said or did. but i think it is all for the better. i want to thank everyone for your support and to please feel free to im me @ baby_g_diaperlover on yahoo.

Thank you everyone, Chalsie

baby_g_diaperlover

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I read the replies here, and it's obvious that TG is something different to everyone. Although I consider myself TG, I know that the probability of me transitioning is about 1 in 1,000, or 'not bloody likely!'

I too wish that I knew at 18 what TG was all about, as it might have explained a lot of things in my life, and prevented a lot of hurt. Of course, it would have brought on more hurt as well. Living in the Pacific Northwest, I find that people here are more open to TG then they would be on the east coast, but still, most people are uncomfortable with the concept of it.

Kanji, I'm sorry that you've decided not to transition. I wish you the absolute best in all of your life and endeavors.

Being TG is more of a frame of mind, I believe, and everyone's mind is different. If it were possible, I think that I would like to be female, I feel that I would be better suited to that than what I am now. But, since I don't have a crystal ball, I don't know, nor does anyone else. This is why the Benjamin Standards **usually** are a good thing, to make sure that you know what you're doing is right.

My only suggestion to you is that you decide what you want. Eighteen is a very early age to make this kind of a decision, but it may be a good place to start. I would start the process by seeing a gender counselor, and see if you are really TG, or if there is something else involved. Eventually, if you love your family, you're going to have to tell them. Be ready for the crushing pain of that, because there usually is some involved. However, parents who care about their children usually come to accept their problems, and help them solve them. I hope yours are such.

What I don't recommend you do is tell your friends. They don't need to know, and unless you can absolutely trust them not to hurt you, then you're opening yourself up for a lot of pain and anguish. They are still finding out who they are, and will have difficulties dealing with you as someone other than who they think you are.

Find information, work the program, and move forward. That's the best advice I can give you.

Gary

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I'm sorry but i really have to disagree with a lot what was just said.

I too wish that I knew at 18 what TG was all about, as it might have explained a lot of things in my life, and prevented a lot of hurt. Of course, it would have brought on more hurt as well. Living in the Pacific Northwest, I find that people here are more open to TG then they would be on the east coast, but still, most people are uncomfortable with the concept of it.

All the hurt i may endure from being TG I think is quite small compared to what i've went through trying live as someone I was not. I know transition is not the easiest thing and it's not something i would chose to do if I had a choice. But, the alternative is far far worse.

Being TG is more of a frame of mind, I believe, and everyone's mind is different. If it were possible, I think that I would like to be female, I feel that I would be better suited to that than what I am now. But, since I don't have a crystal ball, I don't know, nor does anyone else. This is why the Benjamin Standards **usually** are a good thing, to make sure that you know what you're doing is right.

My only suggestion to you is that you decide what you want. Eighteen is a very early age to make this kind of

a decision, but it may be a good place to start. I would start the process by seeing a gender counselor, and see if you are really TG, or if there is something else involved.

One thing that really bugs me is how we constantly have to jump through hoops to prove were TS enough to receive treatment or even to be accepted by the community. I think expressing a desire to change your sex is enough for you to be considered transsexual. When people say things like "and see if you are really TG" they really makes me mad. I don't think many people wake up one day and think "I'm gonna go through a years long process that costs an enormous amount of money and creates a lot of social problems, you know, that sounds like fun", No, I'm sorry, no.

Even the standards of care are designed to make it hard to get treatment. Example: if I went into my psychiatrists's office with severe depression I would leave the office with a script for antidepresants but if I'm diagnosed with GID and i have to wait three months before i can receive the only effective treatment for it. (On a side note, I got my letter of recommendation Friday and I'm going Wednesday to see about starting my hormones ^_^)

I really don't think eighteen is a very early age to make a decision like this. I've known since i was about four. I just wish i hadn't waited this long to do something about it.

I do strongly agree that going to a councilor is the best thing to do, however.

Eventually, if you love your family, you're going to have to tell them. Be ready for the crushing pain of that, because there usually is some involved. However, parents who care about their children usually come to accept their problems, and help them solve them. I hope yours are such.

Unless you want to separate yourself form your family entirely you are going to have to tell tell them. It may or may not go too well but there's really no way to get out of it. I don't know if there's usually crushing pain involved but I know not everyone's parent are going to be very accepting. All i can say is that you're going to know how they are likely to react better than any of us. To anyone telling your parents i wish you the best of luck. The experience for me was overall a positive one but I know it won't be as easy for a lot of people.

What I don't recommend you do is tell your friends. They don't need to know, and unless you can absolutely trust them not to hurt you, then you're opening yourself up for a lot of pain and anguish. They are still finding out who they are, and will have difficulties dealing with you as someone other than who they think you are.

I very strongly disagree with this. Your friends are the very people you need to tell the most. All of us need a lot of support and your friends where you'll get it. If you think that your friends are going to use this information against you somehow then you really need to find better friends.

Besides, if you're beginning transition I don't think it's going to be something you're going to be able to keep from anyone very close to you.

I'm very sorry about the little rant. Please, no one take offence. This is just my opinion, feel free to disregard at will.

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Guest Divinity_Witheld

As a side note, I find a lot of transgendered people are ABs, which is a very small clich for such a high overlap, I've just been curious about that.

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As a side note, I find a lot of transgendered people are ABs, which is a very small clich for such a high overlap, I've just been curious about that.

DW, I personally know of four TS's. All of them, at one time or another, and three of them presently, are also ABs. I have met and talked with several here who are also AB or DLs.

I too have wondered about the connection.

Gary

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I'm sorry but i really have to disagree with a lot what was just said.

All the hurt i may endure from being TG I think is quite small compared to what i've went through trying live as someone I was not. I know transition is not the easiest thing and it's not something i would chose to do if I had a choice. But, the alternative is far far worse.

One thing that really bugs me is how we constantly have to jump through hoops to prove were TS enough to receive treatment or even to be accepted by the community. I think expressing a desire to change your sex is enough for you to be considered transsexual. When people say things like "and see if you are really TG" they really makes me mad. I don't think many people wake up one day and think "I'm gonna go through a years long process that costs an enormous amount of money and creates a lot of social problems, you know, that sounds like fun", No, I'm sorry, no.

Even the standards of care are designed to make it hard to get treatment. Example: if I went into my psychiatrists's office with severe depression I would leave the office with a script for antidepresants but if I'm diagnosed with GID and i have to wait three months before i can receive the only effective treatment for it. (On a side note, I got my letter of recommendation Friday and I'm going Wednesday to see about starting my hormones ^_^)

I really don't think eighteen is a very early age to make a decision like this. I've known since i was about four. I just wish i hadn't waited this long to do something about it.

I do strongly agree that going to a councilor is the best thing to do, however.

Unless you want to separate yourself form your family entirely you are going to have to tell tell them. It may or may not go too well but there's really no way to get out of it. I don't know if there's usually crushing pain involved but I know not everyone's parent are going to be very accepting. All i can say is that you're going to know how they are likely to react better than any of us. To anyone telling your parents i wish you the best of luck. The experience for me was overall a positive one but I know it won't be as easy for a lot of people.

I very strongly disagree with this. Your friends are the very people you need to tell the most. All of us need a lot of support and your friends where you'll get it. If you think that your friends are going to use this information against you somehow then you really need to find better friends.

Besides, if you're beginning transition I don't think it's going to be something you're going to be able to keep from anyone very close to you.

I'm very sorry about the little rant. Please, no one take offence. This is just my opinion, feel free to disregard at will.

Chibi,

While I don't mind you disagreeing with me, don't discount what I have to say.

Every person is different. Obviously, you knew from an early age that you weren't what you were supposed to be, and apparently were in tune enough to know what you were supposed to be. Not all of us are like that. Some, maybe even the majority, have a feeling that things are not the way they are supposed to be, throughout much of their lives, but don't know what 'right' is. Later on, they may realize what it is, and then move to 'fix' it. Others, like myself, were too afraid to admit that there was something wrong with us, that we weren't what we appeared to be, and that we needed to change.

As to the standards, I've been interested in SRA and TG/TS for a very long time, but I never knew why until recently. I finally admitted to myself that was what was wrong with me. BUT, up until maybe 10 or 15 years ago, it was reported that over 50% of individuals going through GRS eventually transitioned back to their birth gender, even without surgeries to restore some sembelence of original genetalia. So, in the 'bad old days', I might transition to female, and then find out that this really wasn't what I wanted, and what it wasn't what I thought it was. So, treatment standards were put into place to prevent that. Now, how many people that have transitioned end up going back? A lot less! Standards of care, and pre screening perform a useful service.

I have one friend who was so sure of herself as a woman, and totally lived as a woman, when she went to see the psychiatrist for her treatments, so impressed this person, that they were ready to write her letter the first day. Not everyone is like that. However, my friend Elizabeth was certainly the exception to the rule, not the majority.

As to 'crushing pain', family and friends, look at this from 'normal' America. An 18 year old young man gets his mother and father together, alone, and very shakily, scared, timid, terrified, says 'Mom, Dad. This is the hardest thing that I've ever had to say, but I think I should be a girl.' Depending on the family, you may go from astonishment, to physical violence. Let's say you tell that to a 30 something couple. The father will probably go through the roof. He'll ask his son, first off guaranteed, if he's gay! He's not going to understand his sons dilemna. His mom will probably cry, a lot. She's not going to understand. This is in a household that respects their kids. In a 'baser' home, the kid will probably get hit, or told to straighten up and act like a man! But, maybe the family will be understanding.

Now, let's take this same 18 year old, fresh out of high school, getting ready for college. Maybe he's been effeminate in high school, maybe a nerd, maybe just a normal kid. Do you possibly think that, unless he's considered 'gay' by his friends, that if he tells them he wants to be female that his friends are going to understand the anguish inside of him? How many of them, in less than pure ridicule, will accept him for that? Some will, most will not, and the word will get out to others who will do more damage to him. Friends don't need to know, until he's at a point where he can openly state his intents, which is probably after he's started hormones, and near to the time of surgery. How many of YOUR friends have you told that you're in transition? And what was their reactions?

I put this not to be argumentative, but to say that not everyone is the same on this road, we're all different, we're all moving in various ways towards something that we can only imagine as a shining goal.

Gary

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DW, I personally know of four TS's. All of them, at one time or another, and three of them presently, are also ABs. I have met and talked with several here who are also AB or DLs.

I too have wondered about the connection.

Gary

One of the connections (and i dont know if this still holds true or not...they may have fixed this) is that a lot of times SRS used to cause damage to the bladder and nerves. So when people transitioned, it would cause them to become incontinant (at least mild if not seveir). I have a friend who had that happen to her.

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As to the standards, I've been interested in SRA and TG/TS for a very long time, but I never knew why until recently. I finally admitted to myself that was what was wrong with me. BUT, up until maybe 10 or 15 years ago, it was reported that over 50% of individuals going through GRS eventually transitioned back to their birth gender, even without surgeries to restore some sembelence of original genetalia. So, in the 'bad old days', I might transition to female, and then find out that this really wasn't what I wanted, and what it wasn't what I thought it was. So, treatment standards were put into place to prevent that. Now, how many people that have transitioned end up going back? A lot less! Standards of care, and pre screening perform a useful service.

I'm sorry but i call bullshit on this. First off, the SOC have been in use since 1979. So the "bad old days" of which you speak are a little farther back than ten or fifteen years ago. Furthermore, the latest version of the SOC released in 2001 actually relaxed some of the requirements for eligibility for SRS. If 50% of people who underwent SRS reverted back to their birth gender I challenge you to produce the data that proves that. Do so and I'll stand corrected, otherwise I'll call it bullshit.

Here I will quote the Wikipedia entry for Standards of care for gender identity disorders: "Numerous criticisms have been made against the HBIGDA-SOC over the course of its history, some of which are reflected in later versions of the guidelines. Most of these criticisms are related to the strictness of the requirements, noting that the rate of post-surgical regret among transsexuals is generally very low — lower than many medically-necessary and cosmetic procedures with less stringent requirements."

As for telling your family, I never said it would be a cakewalk. It's not easy but if your planing to transition then ,sooner or later, it has to be done. I know it comes as a shock to most parents but i hope, at least, they're not moved to violence. I would like to think that if someone's family truly cares for them that they will come to accept them for who they are but, in all honesty, I know that this will not always be the case.

Now, let's take this same 18 year old, fresh out of high school, getting ready for college. Maybe he's been effeminate in high school, maybe a nerd, maybe just a normal kid. Do you possibly think that, unless he's considered 'gay' by his friends, that if he tells them he wants to be female that his friends are going to understand the anguish inside of him? How many of them, in less than pure ridicule, will accept him for that? Some will, most will not, and the word will get out to others who will do more damage to him. Friends don't need to know, until he's at a point where he can openly state his intents, which is probably after he's started hormones, and near to the time of surgery. How many of YOUR friends have you told that you're in transition? And what was their reactions?

You say that "he" should not tell "his" friends until near the time of surgery. I think it would be a bit difficult to keep it hidden that long since one of the requirements of the SOC (which you seem to hold in such high regard) is that you must be living full time for at least a year before being eligible for SRS.

For the record, I've told ALL of my friends and, without exception, they ALL have been supportive of me in what I'm doing. If you have any REAL friends they will accept you for who you are.

Not all of the world is doom and gloom like you make it out to be. Not everyone is going to ridicule you for being who you are. Some people are not going to accept it and that can't be helped. But, this is not some dangerous little secret that you have to hide from everyone, even the people closest to you. Maybe you've had some bad experiences and if so I'm truly sorry but it sounds like you're just telling people to keep it "in the closet". I've kept it hidden away for most of life and I've suffered because of it. Now that everything is out in the open and I can be myself there's no way to express how much better I feel.

You say that everyone is not on the same road but you seem to think that everyone has to have such a hard time. It's not all a bed of roses but it's also not all pain and suffering. You have to take the good with the bad. That's the way life is, whether your trans or otherwise.

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As a side note, I find a lot of transgendered people are ABs, which is a very small clich for such a high overlap, I've just been curious about that.

Just looking at the people on the board here, the the percetage of people who list themselves as transgendered seems to be a good bit higher than that of the population at large. I don't know if this is a good representation of the whole of the transgender or AB/DL communities but there certainly seems to be some kind of a connection.

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I it think a frame of mind i got a girly side i love to read and warm blanket and cudding. :):):):):)

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Without wishing to bog this whole thing down with semantics, I have to say, I'm never really that sure where people are coming from when they talk about transsexualism being a 'state of mind.' I'm not concerning myself with other aspects of gender variance, because then the debate just becomes like trying to knit fog.

I think it was Chibiusa, who said earlier in the debate about knowing from a very early age that things weren't right. I can absolutely identify with this....

....And with that in mind, I feel I could no more call my transsexuality a 'state of mind' that I could watch a moth fly round a lightbulb and then put it down to the moths 'state of mind.' I was driven to the operating table by an all consuming need, that was primal in nature. That's not something that I could ever describe as a state of mind.

If you're transsexual, you just know it, and that's really all there is to it. Unfortunately, I grew up before the the internet, and transsexuality was something that was hardly discussed or known about. So although I knew I was trans, I didn't have a label to pin on myself or have the faintest idea what to do about it. Had things been different, then I certainly would have transitioned at an earlier age. But that's ancient history now. :P

If you know you're transsexual, my advice would always be to find a suitably experienced councillor, and if you're still relatively young, get on hormone blockers ASAP!!! That way, if you decide to go ahead you'll effect a much better transition. And if not, no worries, the hormone blockers won't do any lasting damage.

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Well, I guess I might as well come out to at least this little section of the forum ^^

I am a transexual. Have been one since birth, in my eyes. I'll have to agree with Sammi. If you are a transexual you know it. However, as stated previously, there are different forms of transgenderism, which vary from sexual excitement from dressing in the "opposite" sexes clothes, to varying levels of...empathy, for lack of a better word.

There aren't any "knowns" when it comes to this issue, since transgenderism has been pushed aside for serious studies. Society has improved on it's acceptance, in my eyes, but there is a long way to go.

It's up to you about coming out. It's hard, and it can have detrimental side effects. I don't want to go into any personal details as of yet, but suffice it to say that my life had what I would refer to as a huge hiccup when I revealed my little secret. As things currently stand...the friends I now hang out with don't know, and my family thinks I'm "cured" (forsoothe...I laugh).

Everyone has there own experiences, and please understand that my circumstances are, and have always been, on the rigid side of things. Hopefully, most people won't have to experience anything so harsh, and most don't. ^^

As for the reason that many transgenders identify with ab/dls...a few theories. One, is that many transgenders feel (rightly so) that they had their childhood ripped from them. This could be considered somewhat of way to make up for it.

Also, many transexuals don't feel comfortable with their genitalia, and if you're diapered, it creates a bit of a buffer, so to speak.

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Thank you all for joining in on this topic i stared a few months ago.

i wish the best of luck to anyone trying to find them selves and anyone who is thinking of or has already changed there gender. i realise now that you are who you are. its not a frame of mind, thats the way we are born there is really no explaining it.

Thank you everyone

Chalsie Roberts

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well, i identify as transgender even though i am more of a transsexual. I was born intersex, which basically means i was born both sexes. i did not have a penis at birth, so i was raised as a girl, but i don't have a fuuly working vagina and i never felt like a girl. i came out as a lesbian when i was about 16, and that was helpful but still didnt feel right. when i was 24 i realized i was a guy, which explained a lifetime of hating my body, my boobs in particular. So i went into gender therapy (i was already in regular therapy cuz i have post traumatic stress disorder from childhood trauma). After being in therapy and when time came that i could afford it, i got a double masectamy (breastoffame) and then went on hormones which i've been on for 2 years. I just recently figured out i was into this whole diaper thing... which to be honest is a relief in a way, but a little scary too. ok. a lot scary.

but anyway, transgender is a word that includes not only transexuals, but transvestites (who are USUALLY, but not always) straight men who like to wear women's clothes, drag queens and drag kings (people who wear the opposite sex's clothing for performances), gender queer, gender varient, etc people, who are people who for the most part feel that neither gender really fits them, or they just dont believe in gender at all. And a lot of intersex people identify as transgender, but being intersex doesn't nececearily make someone trans. For me being intersex greatly affected my trauma growing up for several reasons but i'm not going to talk about that cuz it could be emotionally triggering.

There are lots of communities and messege boards and support for all sorts of trans people.

i'll list some if people want. otherwise, my post here is done.

peace. :screwy:

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My heart goes out to people who are transgendered it always has done and will always remain so.

Puberty is difficult enough but to have to go through more changes is just unimaginable.

Try and imagine being born both sexes or being trapped in an alien body - I have tried and believe me it scres me to death.

People are born like this through no fault of their own and have to face bigots and idiots calling them for whatever and it annoys me immensely.

Most of the Tg people I have met have been very sensitive caring people and deserve the chance and the right to be happy.

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