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Antibiotic coated catheter / silver coated alloy european sellers?

8 posts in this topic

Hi, 

I wonder if anyone of you guys from Europe has bought antibiotic coated catheters or coated with silver alloy to reduce bacterial film formation?

I really wanna try having a open end catheter in a diaper for at least a week, but with my current normal latex silicone catheters bacterial colonization occurs, as you guys surely know already, after only a day. Thus, having a catheter more than a day in a diaper is extremely risky. With above mentioned catheters I think it's possible to extend that time to around 3 days

Please let me know if you know any sellers shipping discreetly to Europe. 

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I can't help you with your original question but have you considered the Holly Foley catheter? Its discussed in great detail here and offers a much safer alternative to an open cath. 

Oh and for the record I found about two days with an open catheter in a diaper to be high risk point the hard way. With the Holly Foley some have gone weeks. Using a stent I personally have gone four days with no issues.  

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I think the material of the catheter is a lower risk factor than the open connection between your bladder and the air in your diaper. Especially when lying in your bed your bladder will suck in a little air every time your intestines move upward as it creates a short vacuum in the bladder. That is the moment that together with the air germs can enter the bladder and cause an infection. 

The holy foley in my opinion has two disadvantages compared with a stent. First, the eye you need to cut in the catheter for drainage outside the bladder, leaves sharp edges that can scratch the lining of the sensitive urethra and cause some discomfort. Second, in this catheter a certain amount of pee will stand still in the catheter below the eye. In some situations, again when lying down, this old pee might flow back in the bladder. I think this increases the risk of recieving an infection as well.

With stents the last part of the urethra is closed like it allways is. Germs therefor cannot enter the bladder.

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6 hours ago, Loveable_guy said:

I can't help you with your original question but have you considered the Holly Foley catheter? Its discussed in great detail here and offers a much safer alternative to an open cath. 

Oh and for the record I found about two days with an open catheter in a diaper to be high risk point the hard way. With the Holly Foley some have gone weeks. Using a stent I personally have gone four days with no issues.  

Yeah i've read about it and i'm curious to try it. But, it doesn't reduce the risk as many people are advocating since the majority of bacteria travel extraluminally (along catheter wall). The so called "flushing mechanism" is doubtful but may be beneficial. It's only a drip here and there, and the question is how big of an impact that has on the bacteria. Bacteria attaches to surfaces and an occasional drip of liquid doesn't really affect them, that's at least what I think. Peeing naturally works since it has a stronger flushing force and expels more urine. This method also adds other risks by introducing additional bacteria when cutting, and sharp edges that can damage the urothelium (damaged urothelium has weaker defense mechanisms against bacteria). Not even mentioning the risk of possible breakage of the catheter so that it requires an endoscopic intervention to retrieve the rest of the catheter (or surgery).

The best thing would've been to assemble a mini research of our own, since research would never be provided by anyone else (mostly because it's unethical to see how fast someone gets a UTI and also because the provided knowledge doesn't has any practical applications). But then again, the research would be of very poor quality and it would mean having participants basically waiting to get a UTI and trying to draw conclusions out of that.

8 minutes ago, cathdiap said:

I think the material of the catheter is a lower risk factor than the open connection between your bladder and the air in your diaper. Especially when lying in your bed your bladder will suck in a little air every time your intestines move upward as it creates a short vacuum in the bladder. That is the moment that together with the air germs can enter the bladder and cause an infection. 

The holy foley in my opinion has two disadvantages compared with a stent. First, the eye you need to cut in the catheter for drainage outside the bladder, leaves sharp edges that can scratch the lining of the sensitive urethra and cause some discomfort. Second, in this catheter a certain amount of pee will stand still in the catheter below the eye. In some situations, again when lying down, this old pee might flow back in the bladder. I think this increases the risk of recieving an infection as well.

With stents the last part of the urethra is closed like it allways is. Germs therefor cannot enter the bladder.

You're wrong about the open drainage. An open drainage to a diaper is fairly common after a repair in hypospadias. Check this https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3184301
Short term catherization in a diaper doesn't increase any risks according to this study. The general time having a catheter after that procedure is around 3 - 7 days. It is however in a double diaper with the catheter in the second diaper (thus, reducing contact with skin bacteria).

Bacteria normally travel along the catheter, and not by air. But you're perfectly right about the remaining pee in the holey foley, I forgot to mention that in my above post. 

I agree that stents seem like a safer alternative in the perspective of getting an infection. However, the stent brings a whole array of different risks, arguably, more dangerous or damaging (stent might merge into bladder etc)

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There are stores in the US that will sell without a prescription; cheaper option then buying and importing, no? It depends on the state where they are located, though. For instance, Illinois does not require a prescription for Foley catheters...

I can find a few stores if anyone is interested. I think Allegro is one I used to use.

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A few years back I purchased a variety of caths mail order from Southwest Medical, no questions asked.

I've lost interest, but I did find that too small a cath is very uncomfortable.  The uro did some testing at one point with a little tiny (like 3mm) cath, and that really hurt.  I thought a smaller (12FR) cath would be more comfortable, but in fact a 16FR or 18FR was much more comfortable, and silicone was more comfortable.  Silver-coated caths are available.  YMMV.  I personally liked the single-use sealed systems.

As to bacteria, the urethra touching itself is the best antibacterial we know of.  The surface of the catheter tube, not so much.  So the holey foley makes quite a bit of sense.  The big trick, as noted, is to not have sharp edges!

 

A few years back I purchased a variety of caths mail order from Southwest Medical, no questions asked.

I've lost interest, but I did find that too small a cath is very uncomfortable.  The uro did some testing at one point with a little tiny (like 3mm) cath, and that really hurt.  I thought a smaller (12FR) cath would be more comfortable, but in fact a 16FR or 18FR was much more comfortable, and silicone was more comfortable.  Silver-coated caths are available.  YMMV.  I personally liked the single-use sealed systems.

As to bacteria, the urethra touching itself is the best antibacterial we know of.  The surface of the catheter tube, not so much.  So the holey foley makes quite a bit of sense.  The big trick, as noted, is to not have sharp edges!

***

See: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/720717

This is about a stent-like cath.  I've heard the author's name before, and think he may have an axe to grind.  I don't know if his product is readly available or not.

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